Who Should Be the Agent of My Power of Attorney?

Who Should Be the Agent of My Power of Attorney?

It’s important to understand what a power of attorney is, how it factors into estate planning, and how sibling roles can differ and be shared at the same time.

Considerable’s recent article, “How to assign power of attorney without sparking a family feud,” gives us some idea how the power of attorney can work within a family and among siblings.

A power of attorney or POA is a legal document that allows one person to act on behalf of another, usually when that person is unable to make decisions for themselves for reasons of ill health.

Many people confuse a power of attorney role with the executor of the estate. Power of attorney authority is only in effect while the person who has granted the authority is alive. Once that person dies, the executor of the estate then assumes responsibility of seeing the estate through the probate process. They’re two very different roles, but they can be held by the same person.

The most frequently used is a general power of attorney. The general power of attorney is for management of financial, business, or private affairs. If a parent grants power of attorney to one of their kids, he or she has the sole authority to act on behalf of the parent.

The other siblings have to abide by the inherent authority of the sibling with the power of attorney to make decisions for the parent related to their business affairs.

It’s also important to understand that the power of attorney is a fiduciary obligation. This means the person who holds it must act in the best interests of the parent rather than their own. He or she must also comply with rules. Nonetheless, things can get sticky if there isn’t proper confidence among siblings or transparency when major decisions are being made.

We recommend that you appoint one agent as your power of attorney and then you may appointment an alternate agent. We do not recommend appointing joint powers of attorney.

Whether one or more are entrusted with power of attorney, communication and transparency are the key factors in avoiding painful situations in the family.  Contact an experienced estate planning attorney to discuss these important documents.

 

Reference: Considerable (July 10, 2019) “How to assign power of attorney without sparking a family feud”