Is it Wise to Have Three Grown Children Named Co-Executors of Your Will?

Is it a good idea to have your three grown children listed as co-executors of your will? This may get somewhat confusing when probating a will, if there are multiple executors.

What are the pros and cons to choosing one child to act as your executor, instead of selecting all three of your children to act together?

nj.com’s recent article asks “I’m planning my will. Is it bad to have more than one executor?”

The article explains that the duty of the executor is to gather all the decedent’s assets, pay any outstanding debts and liabilities and then account for and distribute the remaining estate to the beneficiaries, according to the instructions in the decedent’s will.

The executor is allowed to hire professionals and others to help with tasks, like completing a decedent’s final income tax return or preparing the home for sale.

When you have multiple executors appointed, these tasks can be assigned to each person to lessen the burden of the many duties and responsibilities that an executor has.

On the downside, if those appointed can’t work together easily and without strife, appointing multiple siblings can make the administration of an estate much more difficult due to arguments, conflicts of interest, one sibling taking the lead to the resentment of the others or one executor undermining another executor’s actions.

The problem is, in situations where the siblings don’t get along, designating one of them as executor can cause hard feelings and conflict. It’s not uncommon for those siblings who aren’t named as executor, to complain about every decision made by the named executor or delay in the administration of the estate.

If there are multiple executors, the majority rules. That can avoid deadlock. Simple math in this case says that you want to avoid naming an even number of executors or name a person who can act as the tiebreaker.

Even with a “majority rules” agreement among the executors, there are some financial institutions and other entities that may require all the executors to sign documents and/or checks on behalf of the estate. This can become burdensome and inefficient, if there are multiple executors.

Speak with your estate planning attorney about your family dynamics and get their opinion about what would be best in your personal situation.

Reference: nj.com (May 22, 2019) “I’m planning my will. Is it bad to have more than one executor?”

 

Complete Your Financial Plan with Estate Planning

If you are among those who haven’t put together a basic estate plan, you should make every effort to accomplish this in 2019. Your family and friends will thank you.

The Minneapolis Star-Tribune’s recent article, “No financial plan is complete without a basic estate plan” reports that, while Americans are living longer, it was emphasized in a session at the American Society on Aging’s 2019 conference in New Orleans that 56% of Americans don’t have a will.

The basic list isn’t particularly daunting. Talk to an experienced estate planning lawyer to create a will to get your affairs in order.

You should also sign a health care directive and a durable power of attorney. It is also important to decide where you want to be buried or cremated.

You should discuss your late-life goals and desires with your family, relatives and close friends. This gives everyone a better idea about your values and thinking. An estate plan makes things much less stressful on your family.

Many people want to leave at least some money to their loved ones. However, instead of waiting for death to pass on assets, more people are now deciding to “give while living.”

For example, grandparents can help to fund their grandchildren’s education expenses. Nearly two-thirds of people 50 years and older are giving some financial support to family members, according to a survey by the financial services firm Merrill Lynch and demographic consulting firm Age Wave.

Since you are already thinking about your life while devising an estate plan, it is important to understand that far more valuable than your money and assets is your accumulated experience, knowledge and skills. You can tap into your experience later in life to help others succeed.  Your experience and judgment can help family members decide how to have both purpose and a paycheck.

Perhaps you can serve as a mentor for those in your community in areas where you have some expertise?

The desire to leave our families with a legacy is powerful. Don’t leave them without an estate plan.  Remember that giving of our experience can make a significant difference to the community around us.

Reference: Minneapolis Star-Tribune (May 4, 2019) “No financial plan is complete without a basic estate plan”

 

How Do I Organize Estate Planning Documents, So Family Can Find Them?

Keeping track of certain estate planning documents and talking about them with your loved ones, who are likely to live after you pass, can be unsettling. However, they can make their lives easier. Your children and beneficiaries should always know where your estate planning documents are, says Lancaster Online in the article “The paper trail: Keep important documents in order to make it easy on family and friends.”

A will is just one of several important documents that survivors will need to locate. Having access to all estate planning documents will also avoid assets or debts being overlooked. It doesn’t matter if a person owns a single home or has a vast empire of property or multiple investment accounts: being organized matters.

The first mistake people make is not having an estate plan at all. Once assets begin to accumulate, there needs to be a plan to distribute them. An estate planning attorney can work with the person and their family to create the necessary documents and the overall estate plan. The next step is to update that plan, as changes occur in life and in the law. Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney.

A growing problem is accessing digital accounts. Now that bills are paid online and statements are issued electronically, having a comprehensive list of bills, investment accounts, property, insurers and contact information for your CPA, financial advisor and estate planning attorney becomes even more important.

Create a list and let executors and heirs know where that list is. If possible, consolidate some accounts to make the process of settling the estate easier. If health is failing, it becomes more important to take care of this sooner rather than later.

Families left without a list of any kind are advised to start with tax returns, as they contain a wealth of information.

One of the most important things about a will is that someone is going to need to find it. If it’s in a fire-safe box at home and can be located, that’s good. If it is in a safe deposit box in a bank, that may present some problems, unless the executor is on the list of those permitted to access the box and they know where the keys are.

A copy of the will does not work. An original, with inked signatures from the testator and two witnesses must be presented to the court. If there are minor children, the will must name a guardian for the children, or the court may determine that the child is vulnerable and place them with care at a foster home, until a guardian can be determined.

One document that is growing in popularity is a letter of intent. It is not a legally binding document, but is a letter written to survivors to explain the decedent’s reasoning for how the estate was divided, or what specific personal items they want to go to which person. People struggling with grief often create storms over minor things, like Aunt Sara’s first toy doll or Uncle Henry’s fishing rod. The letter might be used to uphold the will, if there is an estate contest.

Maintain the documents in an organized manner, whether a binder, folder, or a pile in a specified location. Tell family members where the documents are, so they can find them easily. Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney to create estate planning documents that are legal.

Reference: Lancaster Online (May 1, 2019) “The paper trail: Keep important documents in order to make it easy on family and friends”

 

Why Do Singles Need These Two Estate Planning Tools?

Morningstar’s article, “2 Estate-Planning Tools That Singles Should Consider” explains that a living will or advance medical directive, are legal documents that detail your wishes for life-sustaining treatment. They are documents that you sign when you are of sound mind and say you want to be removed from life supporting measures, if you become terminally ill and incapacitated.

If you’re on life support with no chance of getting better, you’d choose to have your family avoid the expense and stress of keeping you alive artificially.

Like a living will, a durable power of attorney for healthcare is a legal document that names an agent to make healthcare decisions for you, if you are unable to make them yourself.

A durable power of attorney for healthcare can provide your instructions in circumstances in which you’re not necessarily terminally ill, but you are incapacitated.

When selecting an agent, find a person you trust enough to act on your behalf when you’re unable. Let this person know exactly how you feel about blood transfusions, organ transplants, disclosure of your medical information and other sensitive topics that may arise, if you’re incapacitated.

A durable power of attorney eliminates any confusion, especially if this person is someone other than your spouse. Your doctors will know exactly who the decision-maker is among your relatives and friends.

These two documents aren’t all that comprise a fully comprehensive estate plan. Singles should regularly make certain that the beneficiary designations on their checking and retirement accounts are up to date.

You should also consider your life insurance needs, especially if you have children and/or a mortgage.

It is also important to understand that a living will doesn’t address the issues of a will. A will ensures that your property is distributed after your death, in accordance with your wishes. Ask for help from an experienced estate planning attorney.

These two documents—a living will and a durable power of attorney—can help ensure that in a healthcare emergency, any medical and financial decisions made on your behalf are in accordance with what you really want. Speak with to an estate planning attorney in your state to get definitive answers to your questions.

Reference: Morningstar (April 23, 2019) “2 Estate-Planning Tools That Singles Should Consider”

 

What Are the Six Most Frequent Estate Planning Mistakes?

it is a grim topic, but it is an important one. Without a legal will in place, your loved ones may spend years stuck in court proceedings and spend a lot in legal fees to settle your estate.

The San Diego Tribune writes in its recent article, 6 estate-planning mistakes to avoid, that without a plan, everything is more stressful and expensive. Let’s look at the top six estate planning mistakes that people need to avoid:

No Plan. Regardless of your age or financial status, it’s critical to have a basic estate plan. This includes crafting powers of attorney for both healthcare and finances and a living will.

No Discussion. Once you create your plan, tell your family. Those you’ve named to take care of you, need to know what you’ve decided and where to find your plan.

Focusing Only on Taxes. Estate planning can be much more than just about tax avoidance. There are many other reasons to create an estate plan that have nothing to do with taxes, like charitable giving, special needs planning for a family member, succession planning in the event of incapacity and planning for children of a prior marriage, to name just a few.

Leaving Assets Directly to Children. If you leave assets directly to your children or grandchildren under age 18, it can cause unintended custodian or guardianship issues. Minors can’t own legal property, so a guardian will be appointed by the court to manage the property for them, until they reach age 18. If you don’t name a guardian, the court will appoint one for you and that person may have very different ideas about how the account should be managed and invested.

Making Mistakes with Ownership and Property Titles. With many blended families, you may want to preserve assets from an inheritance as your own separate property or from a prior marriage for your children. There are many tax consequences and control issues in blended families about which you may not be aware.

Messing Up Your Trust. Many people don’t properly fund or update their trusts. An unfunded trust doesn’t do anyone any good. Assets that aren’t titled in the name of the trust don’t avoid probate.

Finally, be sure to review your estate plan regularly, and make an appointment with a local, experienced estate planning attorney  as your circumstances change.

Reference: San Diego Tribune (April 18, 2019) “6 estate-planning mistakes to avoid”

 

What Are the Five “Must Have” Estate Planning Documents?

WTHR 13’s recent article, “The 5 legal documents every adult should have” lists the five key documents involved in estate planning.

  1. General Durable Power of Attorney. This document states who you want to make decisions, if you’re unable to do so for yourself. Without it, your family may have to petition the courts to become your legal guardian, which can be time consuming and expensive. A power of attorney allows the person whom you select, to pay your mortgage or rent and your bills.
  2. Health Care Power of Attorney. This document plans for the situation, if you are unable to make your own health care decisions. You name someone you trust, like family members or friends, to do this on your behalf.
  3. Will. This says that when you pass away, here’s what I want to happen. A will states who will get your assets after your death. If you don’t have a valid will in place, the state laws of intestacy will govern what will happen to your estate—which may not be what you want.
  4. Living Will. This is the document in which you state your instructions for end-of-life care, such as life support. This document is used to make certain that your family and physicians know what you want your end-of-life care to be. A living will is much different than a will.
  5. Revocable Living Trust. This document can be important, if you’re a parent with young children and would like your assets passed down properly to your children, if you die. Typically, if children are under 18 or 21, they’re legally minors and can’t receive assets. A trust can help coordinate their receiving your property.

An experienced estate planning attorney can help you with the creation of these documents, while creating an overall plan so that your wishes are followed, your legacy is protected and your family is secure.

Reference: WTHR 13 (April 17, 2019) “The 5 legal documents every adult should have”

 

How Should My Home be Titled with a Loved One?

Whether you’re single, coupled up, or married, deciding how to hold title to your family home is one of the most critical decisions home buyers make. The effects of that decision may not be apparent for years, says The Washington Post in the recent article, “What you need to know about holding title to a home with a loved one.”

There are three primary ways to title property between spouses. Joint tenancy is the least common and typically must include the language “with right of survivorship and not as tenants in common.” Spouses typically acquire title as “tenants by the entireties,” which only applies to spouses in a limited number of states.

When a couple acquires a home before marriage, in some states, a premarital joint tenancy automatically becomes tenants by the entireties, when they marry. However, the drawback to joint tenancy, is that it’s possible for one spouse’s interest to be alienated by deed or by a judgment lien or bankruptcy. In some states, a joint tenancy can be partitioned, so that the ownership can be separated.

A surviving spouse doesn’t have to do anything upon the death of a spouse, depending on how they held title to their home. Ask your estate planning attorney about any changes to the title of the property, to be certain that title is set up this way.

There are many ways married couples or those in a civil union can hold title to a home. Joint tenancy with rights of survivorship again gives each owner the ability to own the entirety of the home upon the death of the co-owner. This transfer is automatic and doesn’t require any paperwork or legal processing.

Tenancy by the entireties gives the couple the same survivorship rights as a joint tenancy deed, but it also affords the couple certain protections against some creditors. It provides that debts entered into by one of the spouses, shouldn’t cause the loss of the home.

The third form of ownership is to hold title as tenants in common. Here, each owner has a specific percentage ownership interest in the home. When a co-owner dies, that person’s share goes to the person designated in the will or by the laws in the state where the property’s located.

In addition to these three ways to hold title, there are also various estate planning trusts that can be used. Ask your estate planning attorney about what’s best for your specific situation.

Reference: The Washington Post (April 15, 2019) “What you need to know about holding title to a home with a loved one”

 

What Happens When Unmarried Couples Don’t Have Wills?

There can be serious problems when people live together without the benefit of marriage. One is that they don’t have any legal right to make medical decisions for each other. Another is that without any will or estate plan in place, the surviving spouse has no legal right to any of the decedent’s property. That’s just for starters, explains the article “Longtime unmarried couple hasn’t planned for future” from the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

The couple may be pleased with their decision to live on their own terms.  However, by refusing to plan for the inevitable, they are creating an unnecessary difficulty for their loved ones. The children and grandchildren of the couple are likely going to end up having to sort out the mess, after one of the couple dies. They may end up in court, battling over the house or other assets.

If the couple wants their property to end up in the hands of their children when they pass away, having no estate plan is not the way to make that happen. When one spouse dies, any assets they own in joint tenancy will go to the surviving partner. When the surviving partner passes, those assets will go to their children, and nothing will be passed to the other family.

The surviving partner will have no legal right to the assets of the deceased partner, other than any that have been titled to joint tenancy. There is no community property between cohabitating couples, unless they have registered as domestic partners. This is how the law works in California, and every state has its own rules. Assets owned by the deceased partner that are titled in his or her name only, belong to the decedent’s probate estate and will pass to their children. If the gentleman dies first, in this example, will his companion be left homeless?

This is a situation that can be easily remedied with an estate plan, creating wills and trusts that clearly spell out how they want their assets to be distributed upon death. There are many different ways to make this happen, but they will need to work with an estate planning attorney. Where the surviving non-homeowner will live after the homeowner dies is a serious issue, unless other plans have been made. One way to do this is to leave a life estate in the home in his will, or by creating a trust that holds the home for her use. When she dies, the home can then pass to his children. In that case, a series of agreements about how the home will be maintained may need to be created.

Taking the time and making the investment in an estate plan, is for the benefit of the individual and the family. An indifferent attitude about the future is hurtful to those who are left behind. Contact a local, reputable estate planning attorney.

Reference: Santa Cruz Sentinel (April 7, 2019) “Longtime unmarried couple hasn’t planned for future”

 

Who Can I Name as a New Executor of My Will?

MoneySense’s recent article, “Should the sole recipient of an estate be the executor too?” explains that naming someone as an executor is an extremely important duty. The task carries a lot of responsibility. With new rules that have been passed in the last year, the tax reporting and understanding of the assets in an estate is extremely important.

There are several factors to consider, when you think about whom you might name as an executor. First, is age. It’s smart to choose a person who’s younger than you. Although that doesn’t guarantee that person will outlive you, it certainly will up the odds. Ideally, you should try to find a person who is comfortable with the areas of money and tax and doesn’t easily get overwhelmed by paperwork. Since the role of estate executor can be an intense issue that takes a great amount of time, the person you choose ideally will be retired or have the bandwidth to dedicate the substantial time commitment required to do the job properly.

Based on the complexity of the assets in the estate—and the amount of planning the deceased has done to make the job a little bit easier—the winding up of an estate can take more than a year. If the assets must be probated, you’ll want the person you appoint to understand the process and liability that she’s accepting. There are multiple tax returns and filings that must be completed and filed at specific times.

There are banks that offer trust services, but these can be expensive and will take a chunk out of the estate in fees, until the last tax filing is completed. An attorney is also a good choice, but not many lawyers will take on the liability and have the time to act as an executor.

Many people ask a family member who’s either performed these duties in the past or is willing and knowledgeable enough to do things in a conscientious manner and follow through. Remember, the more estate planning that’s done in advance, the easier it makes it for an executor.

Another option is to have two or more adult children act as an executor. However, this can add some complexity to the process, because first they have to both be in agreement on every issue; second, they must both be available to make decisions and sign documents at the same time. These days you can have siblings living from Maine to Oregon, and people can travel all over the world at any time.

Make sure the person you’re considering is aware of not only your thoughts but also of the time commitment and process involved. An executor—unhappy with their role—can ask the court to remove them. However, this can result in the estate being tied up for a long time. Also, make sure you use a reputable estate planning attorney.

Reference: MoneySense (March 27, 2019) “Should the sole recipient of an estate be the executor too?”

 

Why Are Wills So Important?

Drafting a last will and testament is an important part of estate planning. However, even with the critical importance of having a will, a recent AARP survey found that 20% of Americans over the age of 45 don’t have one.

Detailing your wishes helps to eliminate unnecessary work and potential stress and anxiety, when a loved one dies. Wills let your heirs act with the decedent’s wishes in mind, and a will can make certain that assets and possessions wind up in the right hands.

The Oakdale Leader’s recent article, “Things People Should Know About Creating Wills” says that when you meet with an experienced estate planning attorney, he or she will discuss the following topics with you:

Assets: Create a list of known assets and determine which assets are covered by your will and which are to be passed through joint tenancy, beneficiary designation, or a living trust. For instance, life insurance policies or retirement plan proceeds will be distributed directly to the named beneficiaries. A will also can cover other assets, such as photographs, personal items, autos and jewelry.

Guardianship: Parents’ wills should include a clause that states who they want to become guardians of their minor children.

Pets: Some people use their will to state the guardianship for their pets and to leave money or property to help care for them. However, it is important to remember that pets don’t have the legal capacity to own property, so don’t give money directly to pets in your will. In some states, you can establish a pet trust.

Funeral directions: Probate won’t occur until after the funeral, so funeral wishes in a will often go unnoticed. You can let your executor know your wishes in a separate document.

Executor: An executor is a trusted person who will carry out the terms of your will. He or she should be willing to serve and be capable of executing the will.

People who die without a valid will become intestate, which means the estate will be settled based on the laws of where that person lived. The court will appoint an administrator to transfer property. However, the administrator is bound by law and may make decisions that go against the decedent’s wishes. To avoid this, make sure you have a valid will and other estate planning documents.

Reference: Oakdale (CA) Leader (March 27, 2019) “Things People Should Know About Creating Wills”