When Does a Power of Attorney Fail to Do Its Job?

A power of attorney is an essential component of a comprehensive estate plan. However, there are at least two important situations when the power of attorney (POA) will not be recognized and followed.

The IRS and Social Security Administration don’t recognize traditional POAs, explains Forbes’ recent article entitled “Two Times When Your Power Of Attorney Isn’t Going To Work.”

The IRS requires the use of its Form 2848, “Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative” before it will let anyone act on your behalf. This form is required when an agent, even a relative, tries to handle your tax matters, when you are not able to so.

One of the requirements of Form 2848 is that it requires you to state the tax matters and years for which the agent is authorized to act. Form 2848 also requires you to list the type of tax, the IRS form number and the year or periods involved. That is different from a traditional POA to handle financial matters, which frequently has a blanket statement allowing the agent to take a broad range of actions on your behalf in certain matters.

For a married couple that files joint tax returns, each spouse must also separately complete and sign a form. They cannot simply execute a joint form.

Technically, the IRS could accept other POAs, as indicated by the instructions to Form 2848. However, as you can see a POA must meet all the IRS’ requirements to be accepted.

The Social Security Administration is much the same. When you need someone to manage your Social Security benefits, you contact the Social Security Administration and make an advance designation of a representative payee.

This lets you name one or more people to manage your Social Security benefits. The Social Security Administration then is required to work with the named individual or individuals, in most cases.

A person who already is receiving Social Security benefits may name an advance designee at any time. A first-time claimer can also name the designee during the claiming process.

This designee can be changed at any time.

If you do not name any representatives, the Social Security Administration will designate a representative payee on your behalf, if it determines that you need help managing your money. Relatives or friends can apply to be representative payees, or the Social Security Administration can select someone. Contact an experienced estate planning attorney to assist you.

Reference: Forbes (Jan. 28, 2021) “Two Times When Your Power of Attorney Isn’t Going to Work”

 

Every Adults Needs a Will and a Health Care Power of Attorney

A serious illness can happen at any age, but just 18% of those 55 and older have a living will, power of attorney for health care and a last will and testament, according to a 2019 study by Merrill Lynch Wealth Management.

AZ Central’s recent article entitled “What to know about wills and health care power of attorney in Arizona” says that every adult should have these documents, including young professionals, single people and those without children.

These documents make it easier for an individual and their family during a stressful time. They make your wishes clear.  They also help give directions to family members and allow you to name a person you believe is the most responsible and able to fulfill your wishes.

Note that a power of attorney, living will and last will each has its own purpose.  A power of attorney for health care lets your named agent make medical decisions on your behalf if you are incapacitated, while you are still alive. Without a health care power of attorney or living will, it can complicate and delay matters.

A living will or “advance directive” is used when a person needs end-of-life care. This document can provide instructions on how the person wants to be treated, like not wanting a feeding tube or wanting as much medical help as possible.

In contrast, a last will and testament states what happens to a person’s estate or assets after they pass away. A last will can also designate a guardian for minor children.  A last will can state who will be in charge of the person’s estate, known as an executor or a personal representative.

You should name a primary representative and an alternate to serve and provide copies of the documents to the people chosen for these roles.

Contact an experienced estate planning attorney to assist you.

Reference: AZ Central (Jan. 14, 2021) “What to know about wills and health care power of attorney in Arizona”

 

What Is a Conservatorship?

A conservator is appointed by a judge. This person handles the estate of an incapacitated adult, as well as their finances, their basic affairs and everyday care. Administrative matters such as Medicare, insurance, pensions, and medical coverage are all also managed by the conservator. The conservator must keep meticulous records that are subject to review by the judge.

The Advocate’s recent article entitled “Alzheimer’s Q&A: What is adult guardianship?” explains that a conservatorship typically lasts as long as the individual lives. The conservator may change because of death, relocation, or an inability to manage the conservator duties and responsibilities. A judge also has the power to replace the conservator, if he or she is repeatedly making poor decisions or neglecting required responsibilities.

A conservator can be wise in some situations because it lets family members know that someone is making the decisions. It also provides clear legal authority to deal with third parties. There is also a process in which a judge will approve any major decisions. However, appointing a conservator can be expensive. An experienced estate planning attorney or elder law attorney must complete court paperwork and attend court hearings. A conservatorship can also be time-consuming due to the required ongoing paperwork.

A big question is when it is appropriate to seek conservatorship. If the individual has become mentally or physically incapable of making important decisions for himself or herself, then it would be smart to have a court-appointed guardian. Moreover, if the person does not already have legal documents in place, like a living will or power of attorney, then the conservatorship would benefit in covering decisions about personal and financial matters.

Even if the individual has a power of attorney for both health care and finances, he or she might need a conservator to make decisions about his or her personal life. This can include topics, such as living arrangements and who is allowed to visit. It is not always easy to determine if an individual can make decisions, but a judge understands that a conservator is viable for those with advanced Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia.

Families that want to set up a conservatorship need to file formal legal papers and participate in a court hearing before a judge. Evidence of the physical and mental condition of the individual requiring conservatorship must be clearly presented. The person who is the subject of the conservatorship has the opportunity to contest it. Ask an experienced estate planning or elder law attorney who specializes in conservatorships about your specific situation.

Reference: The Advocate (Jan. 25, 2021) “Alzheimer’s Q&A: What is adult guardianship?”

 

The Difference between Power of Attorney and Guardianship for Elderly Parents

The primary difference between guardianship and power of attorney is in the level of decision-making power, although there are many intricacies specific to each appointment, explains Presswire’s recent article entitled “Power of Attorney and Guardianship of an Elderly Parent.”

The interactions with adult protective services, the probate court, elder law attorneys and healthcare providers can create a huge task for an agent under a power of attorney or court-appointed guardian. Children acting as agents or guardians are surprised about the degree of interference by family members who disagree with decisions.

Doctors and healthcare providers don’t always recognize the decision-making power of an agent or guardian. Guardians or agents may find themselves fighting the healthcare system because of the difference between legal capacity and medical or clinical capacity.

A family caregiver accepts a legal appointment to provide or oversee care. An agent under power of attorney isn’t appointed to do what he or she wishes. The agent must fulfill the wishes of the principal. In addition, court-appointed guardians are required to deliver regular reports to the court detailing the activities they have completed for elderly parents. Both roles must work in the best interest of the parent.

Some popular misperceptions about power of attorney and guardianship of a parent include:

  • An agent under power of attorney can make decisions that go against the wishes of the principal
  • An agent can’t be removed or fired by the principal for abuse
  • Adult protective services assumes control of family matters and gives power to the government; and
  • Guardians have a responsibility to save money for care, so family members can receive an inheritance.

Those who have a financial interest in inheritance can be upset when an agent under a power of attorney or a court-appointed guardian is appointed. Agents and guardians must make sure of the proper care for an elderly parent. A potential inheritance may be totally spent over time on care.

In truth, the objective isn’t to conserve money for family inheritances, if saving money means that a parent’s care will be in jeopardy.

Adult protective services workers will also look into cases to make certain that vulnerable elderly persons are protected—including being protected from irresponsible family members. In addition, a family member serving as an agent or family court-appointed guardian can be removed, if actions are harmful.

Agents under a medical power of attorney and court-appointed guardians have a duty to go beyond normal efforts in caring for an elderly parent or adult. They must understand the aspects of the health conditions and daily needs of the parent, as well as learning advocacy and other skills to ensure that the care provided is appropriate.

Ask an experienced elder law attorney about your family’s situation and your need for power of attorney documents with a provision for guardianship.

Reference: Presswire (Jan. 14, 2021) “Power of Attorney and Guardianship of an Elderly Parent”

 

What to Do First when Spouse Dies

Forbes’ recent article entitled ‘Checklist for Handling the Death of a Spouse” tells us what to do when your spouse passes away:

Get Organized. Create a list of what you need to do. That way, you can tick off the things you have done and see what still needs to be done. Spending the time to get organized is critical.

Do an Inventory. Review your spouse’s will and estate plan, and then collect the documents you will need. Use a tax return to locate various types of financial assets.

Identify the Executor. The executor is the individual tasked with carrying out the terms of deceased’s will.

Get a Death Certificate. Request multiple copies of the death certificate, maybe at least a dozen because every entity will need that document.

Contact Your Professional Advisors. You will need to tell some professionals that your spouse has passed away. This may be your CPA, your estate planning attorney, financial advisors and perhaps bankers. These contacts will probably know nearly everything that is required to be done. You will also need to contact the Social Security Administration and report the death.

Take a Step Back. Take a breath. You should take the time to process your emotions and grieve with the other members of your family. Check on everyone and make sure the loved ones remaining are doing all right.

Avoid Making Any Major Decisions. Do not make any major financial decisions for a year. This includes things such as selling a house or making a lump sum investment. After the death of a spouse, you are emotional and looking for advice. It is easy to be pressured into making a decision that might not be in your best interests. Allow yourself permission to be emotional and not make any decision because you recognize you are grieving.

Make Certain Your Spouse’s Wishes Are Carried Out. The best way to honor your spouse is to make sure their requests and wishes are carried out. You are the only individual who can do that. Your spouse expects you to take care of their last wishes the way they had intended. Contact an experienced estate planning attorney to review the will, if any.

Reference: Forbes (Aug. 28, 2020) ‘Checklist for Handling the Death of a Spouse”

 

States with Most Affordable Long-Term Care?

Seven in 10 people 65 and older will require some type of long-term care during their lifetime. This expense will vary based on the patient’s required level of care, care setting and geographic location, says Think Advisor’s recent article entitled “15 Cheapest States for Long-Term Care: 2020.”

A recent study by Genworth found that the cost for facility and in-home care services increased on average from 1.9% to 3.8% per year from 2004 to 2020. That amounts to $797 annually for home care and as much as $2,542 annually for a private room in a nursing home.

At the current rate, some care costs are more than the 1.8% U.S. inflation rate, Genworth said.

These findings were taken from 14,326 surveys completed this summer by long-term care providers at nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult day health facilities and home care providers. The survey encompassed 435 regions based on the 384 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

In a follow-up study, Genworth also found that these factors are contributing to rate increases for long-term care:

  • Labor shortages
  • Personal protective equipment (PPE) costs
  • Regulatory changes, such as updated CDC guidelines
  • Employee recruitment and retention issues
  • Wages demands; and
  • Supply and demand.

Here are the 15 cheapest states for long-term care, according to Genworth with their average annual cost:

15. Utah: $59,704

14. Kansas: $57,766

13. Iowa: $57,735

12. Kentucky: $57,540

11. South Carolina: $57,413

10. Tennessee: $56,664

9. North Carolina: $56,512

8. Georgia: $53,708

7. Mississippi: $52,461

6. Arkansas: $50,835

5. Oklahoma: $50,641

4. Texas: $48,987

3. Missouri: $48,753

2. Alabama: $48,240

1. Louisiana: $44,811

Speak with a qualified estate planning attorney to discuss your options for long term care.

Reference: Think Advisor (Dec. 14, 2020) “15 Cheapest States for Long-Term Care: 2020”

How Can I Easily Pass My Home to My Only Child?

This estate planning issue concerns a single retired parent of an only adult daughter and how to transfer the home to the daughter. Should the daughter simply sell the house when her mother dies, or should the daughter be added to the deed now while her mother is alive?

Also, is there a court hearing?

In many states, there is no reason or requirement to go before a judge to probate your estate, says nj.com in its recent article “Should I add my daughter’s name to my home’s deed?”

In estate planning, there are two primary questions to answer about the transfer of the home. First, there would possibly be some significant capital gains if the mom adds her daughter to the deed prior to death.

Also, if the mother winds up requiring Medicaid, Medicaid might put a lien against the home after she dies for the value of the services it provided.

Generally, when a home has been owned for a long time, the mother should try to preserve the step-up in basis for tax purposes that happens, if the real estate is still in the mom’s name at her passing.

Whether that step up is preserved, depends on how the daughter is added to the deed.  Adding the daughter as a joint tenant or tenant in common won’t preserve the step-up basis for taxes. Ask an elder law attorney what this means in your specific situation.  A better option may be to transfer the remainder interest in the property to the daughter in this scenario and withhold a life estate for the mom.

That will preserve the step-up in basis at death.

This can also get complicated when there’s an outstanding mortgage, so speak to an experienced elder law attorney or estate planning attorney.

Reference: nj.com (Dec. 15, 2020) “Should I add my daughter’s name to my home’s deed?”

 

What are Common Diseases Facing Seniors Hospitalized for COVID-19?

Seniors with several chronic conditions are particularly susceptible to illness and a hospital stay because exposure to the coronavirus, according to newly updated data from the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

Money Talks News’ recent article entitled “Seniors With These 7 Diseases Are Most Often Hospitalized for COVID-19” reports that CMS says that nearly 1.2 million Medicare beneficiaries were diagnosed with COVID-19 from January until the middle of September, and of those, more than 332,000 were hospitalized with a COVID-19 diagnosis during that time.

CMS says that as of October 9, it noted that the data “will continue to change as CMS processes additional claims and encounters for the reporting period.” The numbers show that seven chronic conditions were most common among the Medicare beneficiaries who had been hospitalized:

  • Hypertension: 80%
  • Hyperlipidemia: 62%
  • Chronic kidney disease: 51%
  • Diabetes: 50%
  • Anemia: 48%
  • Ischemic heart disease: 46%
  • Rheumatoid arthritis/osteoarthritis: 46%

Of those who were hospitalized, 21% died and 32% were discharged. The rest were transferred to skilled nursing facilities (22%), home health care (14%), hospice (5%), or other health care settings. Roughly half of the hospital stays lasted for fewer than eight days, and 12% of the stays were at least 21 days.

The research shows that the coronavirus is impacting people of color, older adults and the poor more frequently. This disparity also appears in the Medicare data. CMS says COVID-19 hospitalization rates are extremely high for:

  • Black beneficiaries (1,263 hospitalizations per 100,000 beneficiaries);
  • Hispanic beneficiaries (967 hospitalizations per 100,000 beneficiaries);
  • Beneficiaries who are age 85 or older (1,003 hospitalizations per 100,000 beneficiaries);
  • Beneficiaries who are age 75 to 84 (604 hospitalizations per 100,000 beneficiaries); and
  • Beneficiaries enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid, the government insurance program for people with low incomes (1,374 hospitalizations per 100,000 beneficiaries).

In contrast, the overall rate for all Medicare beneficiaries was 517 hospitalizations per 100,000 people. It might be wise to contact an estate planning attorney beforehand to make sure you have the correct documents for your loved ones.

Reference: Money Talks News (Nov. 19, 2020) “Seniors With These 7 Diseases Are Most Often Hospitalized for COVID-19”

 

Does Sleep Help with Alzheimer’s?

The brain is the center of the nervous system and controls thought, memory, emotion, touch, motor skills, vision, respiration and every process that regulates your body. As we age, it becomes increasingly important to care for the brain — especially to prevent conditions, like Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Considerable’s recent article entitled “Deep sleep may clear the brain of Alzheimer’s toxins” explains previous studies noted that people who sleep poorly are more prone to developing Alzheimer’s. However, scientists were never clear why this was so. A 2013 study performed on mice revealed that while they slept, toxins like beta amyloid (which may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease) were washed away. Nonetheless, scientists had no answers as to the question of why.

This new study says that during sleep, electrical signals (or slow waves) appear, followed by a pulse of fluid that “washes” the brain. The scientists now found an answer to their question, presuming that this fluid is vital in removing dangerous toxins associated with Alzheimer’s.

The study suggests that people might be able to reduce their risk of Alzheimer’s, by getting high-quality sleep.

To come to this conclusion, the researchers used MRI techniques and related technologies to monitor what was going on in the brains of 11 sleeping people. In particular, they monitored cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is vital liquid that flows through the brain and spinal cord. They saw that during sleep, large, slow waves of CSF wash into the brain every 20 seconds. The report said that electrical activity in the neurons provokes each of these waves — the scientists compared all of this to the workings of “a very slow washing machine.”

This groundbreaking finding suggests that people may be able to decrease the risk of Alzheimer’s, by making certain that they get high-quality sleep, says William Jagust, a professor of public health and neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley, in an interview with NPR.

Thus, quality sleep plays a critical part in brain protection, toxin elimination and neurodegenerative disease prevention.

Previous Alzheimer’s medications have targeted specific toxins that are readily present in diseased brains, such as beta amyloid. However, these drugs all failed once going into clinical trials, perhaps because they were only targeting one part of the issue.

The current study opens a new pathway for treatment that would concentrate on increasing the amount of CSF in the brain all together, instead of targeting specific toxins. That’s according to Maiken Nedergaard, a neuroscientist at the University of Rochester, who led the 2013 study on mice, told WIRED.

Speak to an experienced elder law attorney if you have questions.

Reference: Considerable (Sep. 29, 2020) “Deep sleep may clear the brain of Alzheimer’s toxins”

 

What Do I Need to Do after the Death of My Spouse?

It probably is the last thing on your mind, but there are tasks that must be accomplished after the death of a spouse. You might want to ask for help and advice from a trusted family member, friend, or adviser to sort things out and provide you with emotional guidance.

Kiplinger’s recent article entitled “Checklist: Steps to Take after Your Spouse Dies” provides a checklist to help guide you through the most important tasks you need to complete:

Don’t make any big decisions. It’s not a good time to make any consequential financial decisions. You may wish to sell a home or other property that reminds you of your spouse, but you should wait. You should also refrain from making any additional investments or large purchases—especially if you weren’t actively involved in your family’s finances before the death. Contact your estate planning attorney.

Get certified copies of the death certificate. You’ll need certified copies of your spouse’s death certificate for any benefit claims or to switch over accounts into your name. Ask the funeral home for no fewer than 12 copies. You also may need certified marriage certificates to prove you were married to your late spouse.

Talk to your spouse’s employer. If your spouse was working when he or she passed, contact the employer to see if there are any benefits to which you are entitled, such as a 401(k) or employer-based insurance policy. If you and your dependents’ medical insurance was through your spouse’s job, find out how long the coverage will be in effect and begin making other arrangements.

Contact your spouse’s insurance company and file a claim. Get the documentation in order prior to contacting the insurance company and make certain that you understand the benefit options to claim a life insurance benefit.

Probate the estate. Get a hold of the will. Contact the attorney for help in settling the estate. If your spouse didn’t have a will, it will be more complicated. Reach out to an experienced estate planning attorney or elder law attorney for advice in this situation.

Collect all financial records. Begin collecting financial records, including bank records, bills, credit card statements, tax returns, insurance policies, mortgages, loans and retirement accounts. If your spouse wasn’t organized, this might take some time. You may be required to contact companies directly and provide proof of your spouse passing, before being able to gain access to the accounts.

Transfer accounts and cancel credit cards. If your spouse was the only name on an account, like a utility, change the name if you want to keep the service or close the account. Get a copy of your spouse’s credit reports, so you’ll know of any debts in your spouse’s name. Request to have a notification in the credit report that says “Deceased — do not issue credit.” That way new credit won’t be taken out in the spouse’s name.

Contact government offices. Have your spouse’s Social Security number available and call the Social Security Administration office to determine what’s required to get survivor benefits. Do this as soon as possible to avoid long delays before you get your next Social Security payment. You may also qualify for a one-time death benefit of $255. If your spouse served in the armed forces, you may be eligible for additional benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Therefore, contact your local office.

Change your emergency contact information. Change any of your or your family members’ emergency contact info that had your spouse’s name or number listed as someone else’s primary point of contact.

This checklist is a good way to help with the pressing tasks. You can also contact an estate planning attorney or elder law attorney for help.

Reference: Kiplinger (Aug. 27, 2020) “Checklist: Steps to Take after Your Spouse Dies”