How Older Travelers Can Stay Safe

How Older Travelers Can Stay Safe

One of the top dreams of retirees is to travel, whether to visit the kids and grandkids or go to all those places you did not have the time or money to explore when you were working and rearing your family. The joy of travel can turn into a nightmare, however, if you find yourself a victim of unsafe circumstances. Here are some recommendations from the U.S. Department of State on how older travelers can stay safe when abroad.

Months Before Your Trip

If there is a problem with your passport, you could get stranded at customs and immigration in a foreign country. When you first begin to plan your trip, pull out your passport and check the expiration date. If there are not at least six months left after you return from your travels, renew your passport.

Some people make the mistake of thinking that the six-month guideline applies to the day you start your trip. However, it actually refers to the date you get home. Just make sure you do not delay in sending in your renewal application. It can take several months or longer for you to receive your new passport.

Before You Finalize Your Travel Plans

Do not deposit any money or pay for your airfare, hotel, tours, or other costs, before you check out these websites:

  • The S. State Department website issues travel warnings to let you know when there is a safety concern in another country. You do not want to walk into the middle of a country’s civil war or other violence. The State Department will also let you know the legal requirements for entering specific countries. If you need a visa, follow the instructions on how to obtain one and allow plenty of time. Some countries allow you to get a visa online or at your arrival airport.
  • The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issues guidance on required and recommended vaccinations for visiting particular countries. Some of these vaccines require multiple injections spaced weeks apart, so you should check well in advance of your trip. You might have to carry proof of vaccinations to be allowed into a country.

Money Makes the World Go ‘Round

It is no fun to be on your trip of a lifetime and suddenly be unable to use your bank or credit cards. Notify your banks and credit card companies of the dates you will be traveling, and in which countries, so they do not put a security freeze on your accounts. Find out where you can make deposits and withdrawals, while on the road.

Compare international transaction fees to avoid excessive charges. You can order some local currency from your bank to have on hand, as soon as you land in a country. Therefore, you will not have to stand in long lines at the currency exchange in the airport. Search online to find out where you can get the best currency exchange rate at your destination. Exchange rates fluctuate constantly, so be sure to check and recheck.

Medication

Some countries restrict certain medications that are legal in the United States. Check on the State Department website to find out if any of your drugs are illegal where you will be traveling. Always carry prescription medication in the original pharmacy container, and have your doctor write extra prescriptions for you, in case you lose your drugs. Carry enough medicine for the trip and some extra, in case you experience any delays.

Your local elder law attorney can help you prepare the legal documents that will give you peace of mind during your travels, and explain to you how your state regulations might differ from the general law of this article.

References:

AARP. “State Department Wants Older Travelers to Stay Safe.” (accessed December 29, 2018) https://www.aarp.org/travel/travel-tips/safety/info-2018/state-department-recommendations.html

U.S. State Department. “Country Information.” (December 30, 2018) https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/International-Travel-Country-Information-Pages.html

CDC. “Vaccines. Medicines. Advice.” (December 30, 2018) https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel